City’s first Gay Prom draws dozens of area students Saturday night (8 photos)

Seniors+Matt+Zinik+%28facing+forward%29+and+Evan+Skora+dance+at+the+first+Gay+Prom%2C+an+event+they+helped+organize+for+their+Senior+Hero+Project.+Credit%3A+Rachel+Crane%2FThe+Foothill+Dragon+Press

Chandler Gerard-Reimer

Seniors Matt Zinik (facing forward) and Evan Skora dance at the first Gay Prom, an event they helped organize for their Senior Hero Project. Credit: Rachel Crane/The Foothill Dragon Press
Seniors Matt Zinik (facing forward) and Evan Skora dance at the first Gay Prom, an event they helped organize for their Senior Hero Project. Credit: Rachel Crane/The Foothill Dragon Press

Dozens of students between 14-20 years old attended the event, which was organized by four Foothill seniors as their Senior Hero Project. 

The dance, which provided a welcoming and safe environment for gay students, raised money for COLOR (Community Organized for Liberty Opportunity & Respect), which also helped to provide mentors and pay for some of the costs. Students enjoyed a raffle of prizes donated by sponsors supportive of the gay community.

Elegantly dressed teens, from girls in full length gowns to boys sporting rainbow ties and suspenders, danced for hours. A DJ played top hits and dance classics and the floor was occupied every minute.

Organized by Taylor Kennephol, Evan Skora, Cara Fuller and Matt Zinik, the Hero Project took six months to prepare.
“Over 75 hours of work went into this,” Zinik said. “We went downtown and put up posters and asked for donations.”
The four seniors were noticeably pleased to have students attend from schools other than Foothill.
Buena junior girls Zara Youtz and Rayna Graff said they heard about the event from their Gay Straight Alliance (GSA) club.
When asked what brought them to the event, Youtz said that although she’s only recently joined GSA, she’s doing everything she can to support it, including participating in Friday’s Day of Silence, a nationwide event protesting the bullying or harassment of members of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender community.
Graff, who wasn’t silent on Friday but wore red to support the cause, echoed Youtz’s desire to end discrimination.  
“People are people, and they should be treated the same,” Graff said.
Youtz agreed.
“Yeah, whatever you want, whoever you want to love, that’s all about you and not anyone else.”

 

Credit: Rachel Crane/The Foothill Dragon Press

What do you think?