Students compete for “Golden Crutch” in BioScience Olympics

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Students compete for “Golden Crutch” in BioScience Olympics

BioScience students participate in the

BioScience students participate in the "five-legged race" at the BioScience Olympics. Credit:

BioScience students participate in the "five-legged race" at the BioScience Olympics. Credit:

BioScience students participate in the "five-legged race" at the BioScience Olympics. Credit:

Bryn Treloar-Ballard

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BioScience students (from left) sophomores Charlotte Fox, Kira Tebbe, Ashley Amal, and Ashley Quezada participate in the "five-legged race" at the BioScience Olympics. Credit: Emily Chacon/The Foothill Dragon Press

BioScience students (from left) sophomores Charlotte Fox, Kira Tebbe, Ashley Amal, and Ashley Quezada participate in the “five-legged race” at the BioScience Olympics. Credit: Emily Chacon/The Foothill Dragon Press

A bejeweled “Golden Crutch” awaited Cohort 8, the winning class in the BioScience Olympics on Friday. The Olympics are an annual event put on by the BioScience Leadership Team in order to promote a friendly atmosphere, and to give students a break from the academic rigors of the BioScience Academy.

The three graduating classes, or Cohorts 8, 9, and 10, as they are known in the Academy, competed against each other in various science and medically- oriented games for bragging rights to lord over the other cohorts. However, the rivalries among the cohorts are lighthearted.

“Everyone was unified and cheering for their teams, and working together for a common goal,” said junior Madi Stevenson, a member of Cohort 9.

Many of the games did require teamwork in order to encourage the students to strengthen bonds. The cohorts competed in five-legged races and had to properly put a splint on a fellow student while blindfolded. Some also participated in an event called “Rescue the Baby,” in which a group of students had to follow clues to find a sack of flour hidden on campus within a 15-minute time limit.

Sophomore Casey O’Neill is part of the newest group in the BioScience Academy, Cohort 10. O’Neill expressed her enthusiasm for the Olympics.

“I did the ‘Rescue the Baby,’ and I was running so fast. It was impossible, but it was amazing,” said O’Neill.

Senior Tyler Bransfield felt the Olympics were an enjoyable experience. However, he also challenged the necessity of holding the event.

“Instead of buying Corrales burritos and organizing socials, we should be coming together for community research,” said Bransfield.

Research has been a hallmark of the Academy in years past, and biotechnology teacher Mika Anderson plans to continue this legacy. Students in her class will study microbiology in partnership with the Ventura County Medical Center, giving them the opportunity to work with bacteria on a daily basis.

Sarah Serrano is a member of the BioScience Leadership Team, and helped orchestrate the events in the Olympics. She appreciated the cooperative nature of the BioScience Olympics.

“As the BioScience Academy, we want to make sure that everyone is familiar with each other, and really have that bonding experience,” said Serrano. “The Olympics are sort of a way for all of us to just gather around and cheer and be weird.”

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